Contact Us

For questions, suggestions, or more information about Aavid or the Genie, our Online Thermal Design Tool, please contact the Aavid Genie Team!

We welcome your feedback!

CONTACT EMAIL: contact@aavidgenie.com

Support

If you are having issues or need help with the application, please contact Aavid Genie Support directly at the email below.

You may also want to view the Genie FAQs or the Genie Blog.

SUPPORT EMAIL: support@aavidgenie.com

Frequently Asked Questions

Using Genie: Technology Selection

What flow rates do “Low”, “Medium”, and “High” refer to?

In “Technology Selection”, low flow is at a velocity of 1 m/s, medium flow has a flow velocity of 5 m/s, and 10 m/s flow velocity for high flow. You can update the flow rate when you go to the “Flow Definition” step before simulating.

What type of heat sinks does Aavid Genie support?

Aavid Genie designs straight fin heat sinks utilizing extrusions, bonded fin, brazed fin, folded fin, skived fin, and zipper fin heat sink assembly technologies.

How does Aavid Genie generate heat sinks for the Technology Selection Matrix?

Aavid Genie first tries to find a heat sink that meets your project conditions. If Genie cannot find a solution for that Technology/Flow combination, the box in the matrix will be colored red, with the condition that isn’t being met written in red text.
 
Aavid Genie then reduces the amount of material of each Technology/Flow Combination, while still meeting the project conditions.

How do I pick a heat sink type/technology?

This is dependent on your requirements and preference. Within the application, you can have Genie “rank” the technology/flow combinations based on your key requirements such as “weight” or “size”. This allows you to choose the technology that best suits your needs.

How do I pick between natural or forced convection?

This is dependent on our application requirements and conditions. Applications that experience debris, require high reliability beyond what a fan would allow, or are extremely noise sensitive would be good candidates for natural convection. Additionally, smaller and lower power applications may not require forced convection. Read more about the comparison between natural convection versus forced convection in our Aavid Genie blog post.